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Kavita Devgan Busts 12 Health Myths

Kavita Devgan

Kavita Devgan
27 March 2020

This article is authored by Kavita Devgan. Kavita is an acclaimed nutritionist with 20 plus years of experience as a weight loss and holistic health consultant.

Stay on top of the common misinformation around you by getting your facts from verified experts. Adopt of a healthy lifestyle by being aware of these common myths about health and weight loss.

12 health myths

Myth #1: Women are less prone to lifestyle related diseases like diabetes, hypertension etc. than men.

Fact:

Women have protection to such diseases only till they are menstruating. After reaching menopause, females become more susceptible to these diseases than their male counterparts. So, all women approaching menopause must start taking care of their food and exercise.

Myth #2: Zero carb diet is the way to lose weight.

Fact:

Removing carbs completely never works. Our body needs carbs for nourishment, but make sure you choose the right ones (opt for whole over refined) and keep portions in control. Banishing them will only make you crave more for them.

Myth #3: Missing a meal will help you lose weight.

Fact:

The only thing that will happen if you miss a meal is stronger cravings leading to overeating later, to make up for the energy of the lost meal. You will end up consuming more calories than the calories in missed meal. Missing a meal also slows down metabolism which in turn goes in a panic mode to conserve the available energy. The result is a sluggish, exhausted body.

Myth #4: If you take a vitamin supplement in the morning, you don’t need to worry about what you eat the rest of the day.

Fact:

Although vitamin supplements may provide all the vitamins you need each day, there are lots of other important nutrients they don’t provide. So, it’s still important to choose a healthy balanced diet. Remember, vitamin supplements are no substitute for a healthy diet.

Myth #5: Cut apple kept for some time turns brown indicating it’s a good source of iron.

Fact:

No, apple is not a good source of iron in fact it can be counted as poor source of iron in fruits category where even watermelon has more iron. It gets brown because of oxidation with air (known as Maillard’s Reaction).

Myth #6: Sweating out in gyms only is a sure shot way to keep fit.

Fact:

Not when your eating habits are not in control. Eating a healthy, balanced diet along with a physically active schedule helps to keep you fit and trim. Literally speaking, walking that extra mile helps, to burn calories and keeping you in shape.

Myth #7: Jaggery is okay for diabetics or weight watchers.

Fact:

No, jaggery is also a form of simple sugar, which is readily absorbed in our body and gives calories. Definitely not suitable for diabetics but is a better option than table sugar as has some iron and some vitamins.

Myth #8: Fat-free is calorie-free.

Fact:

Don’t indulge in extra-large servings of fat-free foods, such as cookies, cakes and crackers - these foods may contain the same amount or even more calories than regular versions. Get the right facts by checking food labels for the serving size and number of calories per serving.

Myth #9: Margarine contains less fat than butter, so is better than butter.

Fact:

Butter and margarine contain different types of fat, but in similar amounts and also have equal number of calories. In fact, butter is a healthier option, of course, in smaller quantities as margarine is rich in saturated fatty acids as well as trans-fatty acids, which raise blood cholesterol.

Myth #10: Sprinkling lemon juice on the fat on meat dissolves it.

Fact:

Lemon juice, although a good source of vitamin C, won't dissolve the fat in fatty foods. The best way to get rid of the fat on the meat is to cut it off or choose leaner cuts.

Myth #11: Pickles are not rich in calories.

Fact:

Oil and salt are the common preservatives used in pickles. Oil is high in calories and excessive sodium is bad for health. Pickles often tend to be an unhealthy accompaniment with food, especially readymade ones. A better substitute can be oil-free (or low salt and oil) homemade pickles and mint and coriander chutney made with low salt.

Myth #12: Fish contains a lot of sodium.

Fact:

Yes, if the fish is canned, smoked or pickled. But fresh fish, whether saltwater or freshwater, is naturally low in sodium ‑- a three-ounce serving of Atlantic cod has only 66 milligrams, for example.

Make sure you stay away from misinformation and urban legends, and keep your body and mind healthy, always.



DISCLAIMER

The views and opinions expressed, and assumptions & analysis presented in this content piece are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organization, employer or company. The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

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Pregnancy’s effect on blood pressure and how a healthy diet helps

This article is authored by Dr. Dharini Krishnan, an award-winning Consultant Dietitian, she believes that for a healthy body and mind, we must combine modern medicine with native Indian practices which are proven to benefit us.

It is no mean feat to grow another human being inside oneself. So, it comes as no surprise that pregnancy has several profound impacts on the body.

Plasma volume increases progressively through pregnancy. Cardiac output increases by 20%. The mother’s body requires more iron to produce foetal haemoglobin and certain other enzymes, as well as folate and B12. Her glucose metabolism undergoes changes to provide the foetus with sufficient glucose and energy and fuel its development. And the growing uterus causes mechanical changes to the digestive tract, pushing the stomach upwards and increasing gastric pressure.

Pregnancy and blood pressure

Eat Breakfast

Among these many changes, one significant shift that women should watch out for is a change in blood pressure. The pregnancy causes blood pressure to decrease in the first and second trimester but increase in the third. This increase in blood pressure can have a significant effect on the foetus if care is not taken.

It can cause a decrease in blood flow to the placenta, affecting the amount of oxygen the baby receives. This can, in turn, lead to intrauterine growth restriction, low birth weight, or premature birth. High blood pressure can also cause the placenta to be separated from the uterine wall, causing severe bleeding.

There are several factors that contribute to increases in blood pressure during pregnancy. The risk increases if women are overweight or obese, over 35 years of age, not getting enough physical activity, carrying more than one child or have a family history of hypertension.

How a healthy diet can help

Skin Care

Pregnant woman must also look into their iodine intake, as deficiency of iodine in the mother can lead to congenital abnormalities and decreased intelligence. Supplementation of iodine in severely deficient mothers is likely to increase the IQ of the infant. In severe cases of deficiency cretinism could precipitate. Iodine deficiency also leads to hypothyroid issues in the mother and infant. The easiest and best way to ensure that the required iodine reaches the mother is through iodised salt.

However, one of the main contributors to high blood pressure is dietary sodium. Sodium levels in the diet increase from added salt as well as from processed or ready-to-eat foods. Hence, pregnant women should highly restrict the consumption of foods high in sodiumsuch as pickles, papads, and preserved food. Store-bought sauces are also another prominent contributor of sodium and should be avoided as far as possible.

One good way to do this is to replace salty tastes with tangy or citrus tastes. For instance, pregnant women require a large quantity of fresh fruits and vegetables in their daily diet to ensure adequate micronutrients. A good way to achieve this without adding more salt to the diet is through fresh salads seasoned with lime juice or coriander.

Another clear contributor to high blood pressure is bad cholesterol. When the arteries get clogged due to cholesterol, this forces the heart to pump harder, which increases blood pressure. Thus, women should also stay away from unhealthy cooking such as fried foods and dishes containing trans fats. What’s more, fried foods also often contain high levels of sodium, which increases sodium intake.

Sweets and desserts, particularly those prepared outside the home, can also be red flag. Such preparations often contain unhealthy fats, which again contribute to bad cholesterol and high blood pressure.

While it might seem like that cravingsareundeniable, all our cravings are learnt and we do get used to a variety of tastes over time. So, when eating while pregnant, it’s time to cut down on sodium-richand fatty foods, and experiment with more fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as a range of other spices and herbs. This will ensure that you and your baby stay healthy and happy.



DISCLAIMER

The views and opinions expressed, and assumptions & analysis presented in this content piece are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organization, employer or company. The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

 

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